Posted in Pics

Frozen: CB&W

I didn’t have to work very hard to find photos that exemplify “chilled.” In fact, I didn’t even have to work very hard to make these photos black and white, there was virtually no color in them to start.

frozen 1

The storm door to the screened in porch frosted over when there was a cold snap upstate that lasted for weeks this December and January. The grey ambient light and the layer of frost on, seemingly, everything, muted the colors and brought out the patterns frozen in the moisture on the window. It was beautiful–but golly it was cold!

frozen 2

I took these photos with my iPhone as I hadn’t brought my good camera with me upstate (and even if I had, it was far to cold to take it outside without a huge fuss). In spite of the fact that I was shivering and using a phone camera, these came out quite beautifully!

Posted in Pastries, Pics

Very Chocolate Croissant: WPC

This week’s challenge is “sweet.” Oh dear, talk about a paradox of plenty! I have so many photos of sweet things, how could I pick?!

croissant 2

Rather than pulling from old photos–because where would I start?–I decided to find something new. Conveniently, on Thursday I decided to treat myself to a pastry from Chanson (in the Flatiron District).

croissant 4 Continue reading “Very Chocolate Croissant: WPC”

Posted in Pics

Newton’s Cradle: CB&W

This week’s challenge for Cee’s Black and White Photography Challenge was toys. Fun! I toyed with (get it?!) the idea of photographing my sewing machine or my silly ‘adult coloring books’. But for me crafting and toys are different categories. So I decided to fiddle around with my Newton’s Cradle.

newton 5

I wanted to freeze it with one of the end balls in mid-air but my apartment isn’t light enough to use such a fast shutter speed and still have a semi-decent photo. Still I got some fun shots, I think.

newton 1

Particularly this one, where even though the movement isn’t frozen, you can see the movement of the end balls.

 

You can sort of see the motion in all of them actually. And in some ways I think it’s cooler that way than frozen mid-swing.

newton 2

Posted in Pics

Wallpaper: WPC

Delta is the symbol used to denote change in mathematic and scientific equations. For example, students are taught that velocity = change in position / change in time. That equation is often given as v=(x-x)/(t-t) [with the first x and t having subscript 2 and the second x and t having subscript 1 to denote that they are two discrete location and time coordinates, but I can’t figure out how to get subscript characters in WordPress!] This, of course, is more simply written as v=∆x/∆t. In other words, a delta represents not some nebulous concept of change but a specific, measurable change between two distinct points in time (or space).

IMG_1618
Removing layers and layers of wallpaper

Continue reading “Wallpaper: WPC”

Posted in Pics

Shakespeare’s Garden

In case you were wondering, this is Shakespeare’s Garden in Central Park, NYC. Not, say, the garden at Shakespeare’s birthplace in Stratford-upon-Avon. (Although I have been there. See?:

Now that was actually Shakespeare’s Garden.)

IMG_1569

In any case, this Shakespeare’s Garden is tucked away in Central Park, nearish the W81th street entrance. It’s beautiful! Continue reading “Shakespeare’s Garden”

Posted in Pics

Dandelions: WPC

I’ve recently handed in two term papers and, as if on cue, the skies darkened and the temperature dropped into the low 60s. So on top of the let down at the end of a hard year, I’ve got a sinus headache that won’t quit. Not that writing the papers, finishing the papers, or having this headache have stopped me from baking, they’ve just stopped me from blogging about it. So stay tuned for some brilliant baked goods (plus at least one crafty project). But in the meantime, here’s my entry for the latest weekly photo challenge: Evanescent. Continue reading “Dandelions: WPC”

Posted in Pics

How is a Political Science Book like a Lilac?: WPC

They’re both dense! *crickets chirping*

I was actually planning on taking this week’s challenge literally, just as I’ve done the last couple weeks (with “green” and “atop“). I like the idea of working through different elements of photographic composition–color and perspective, respectively, and now texture. Fun!

But as I was sitting doing one of my readings this week, I couldn’t help but interpret “dense” as “(of a text) hard to understand because of complexity of ideas.” I’d already selected and edited my “dense” as in “having the constituent parts crowded closely together” photos. So they’re here too!